The Secret to Transitioning to Organic Foods - Zestio
1771
single,single-post,postid-1771,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,columns-3,qode-theme-ver-7.4,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.1.1,vc_responsive

The Secret to Transitioning to Organic Foods

locally grown

10 Feb The Secret to Transitioning to Organic Foods

Is buying organic worth it? As my husband and I manage and organic beef production business, we believe it is. Yes, organic is more expensive but the nutritional benefits are much greater. However, if you’re like us, buying everything organic may not be affordable or available. The Environmental Working Group published a list of the Dirty Dozen and Clean fifteen, which assists in making that transition to organic fruits and vegetables easier.

Essentially, when you head into the supermarket you have three options in which to feed the family. Let us use good old strawberries as an example,

  1. Buy a packet of strawberry puree from the freezer section
  2. Buy a punnet of strawberries from the general display in the produce department, its cheap but goodness knows what chemicals had been applied to it to keep it fresher for longer,
  3. Buy a punnet of strawberries from the organic display in the produce department, know that the chemicals used in its production are naturally based and it really is fresher.

Organically grown strawberries are one of the least contaminated foods in the whole fruit & vegetable section. I am also well aware that these options are in order of cheapest to most expensive too. Integrating organic produce into your menu is more successful and has less impact on your hip pocket if it is done gradually. Committing to cooking whole foods from scratch, alongside careful meal planning, home gardening and food preservation (all topics that we will discuss in coming weeks), can largely counteract the cost of organic food purchases.

Realistically transitioning to organic foods is a process, especially when having to work within a budget so this is where the Dirty Dozen & Clean Fifteen can be helpful for you. Evaluate what is available in your local area (farmers market / supermarket), the tastes of your family, & the expense of conversion.

Dirty Dozen

These have the most amount of pesticides & contamination so are best to be eaten organically.

Apples
Celery
Capsicum
Peaches
Strawberries
Nectarines
Grapes
Spinach
Lettuce
Cucumbers
Blueberries
Potatoes

Clean Fifteen

These have the least pesticides used & make less of a difference for organic, but best to buy locally if you can.

Onions
Sweet Corn
Pineapples
Avocado
Cabbage
Sweet peas
Asparagus
Mangoes
Eggplant
Kiwi Fruit
Rockmelon
Sweet potatoes
Grapefruit
Watermelon
Mushrooms

This is a wonderful list for making a start, but ultimately we just have to do the best we can.

locally grown

 

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Free Smoothie Infographic
Subscribe for a free Smoothie Infographic and recipes from Zestio!
Free Smoothie Infographic
We won't share your information with anyone
Awesome!
It's on its way! Check your inbox and enjoy!
Free Baby Puree Recipes eBook!
Subscribe for a free eBook recipe guide that covers the first 2 weeks, packed with easy recipes and helpful tips.
Free Smoothie Infographic
We won't share your information with anyone
Awesome!
It's on its way! Check your inbox and enjoy!